Shuangyue Wan, China: Kitesurf Hidden Gem

Every summer, when easterly recedes and southwesterly picks up, kitesurfers in Hong Kong had to retreat from Shui Hau Wan but they are left with very limited options: fun-sized Pui O Beach and rubbish-covered Lung Kwu Tan. Added with underwhelming wind condition that seldom goes above 15 knots, taking a short getaway to one of multitude of beaches along the southeastern coast of China has become a popular alternative. Among the many beaches I’ve been to in the Guangdong and Fujian Provinces, I found Shuangyue Wan a very attractive spot given its great beach, incredibly cheap accommodation and mouthwatering seafood.

Shuangyue Wan, or Double-moon Beach, got its name from its twin moon-shaped beaches: one facing the southwest Daya Wan, the other facing the east Honghai Wan. The southwestern beach is good for the prevailing southern west wind in the region during summer.

I went up to the hill on the far southern tip of the beaches to get this panoramic view of the area:

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My buddy Steven also took the below with his DJI drone:

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The beach facing Daya Wan has better kiting condition because it’s less choppy than its eastern counterpart. The beach extends some 7 kilometers.

After a full day of kitesurfing session, a table of fresh seafood at the market some 5-minutes walk from the beach is something to die for. Mantis shrimps is a must-try as they are guaranteed to come with cream. You also wouldn’t believe how cheap it is – with just shy of 12 USD per person, the 5 of us ordered 6 seafood dishes, 1 chicken, and, of course, many Tsing Tao’s.

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Accommodation: Plenty. All are beach-side hotel/hostels, within 20 meters along the beach. The price varies from some 10USD / room on weekdays (the normal sketchy ones), to some 120USD / room at weekends (the fancy ones with sea food buffets).

Transportation: With heavy and bulky gears, the best way to get to the beach is driving / renting a car. Set Double-moon Beach on your Google Map (or 万科双月湾 on amap, the Google Map equivalent that works better in China) and follow the recommended route.

Bear in mind that Shungyue Wan, among many other less developed areas in China, are plac

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